API based Custom FormValidation using SemanticUI/Jquery

In the last post, we discussed on how to implement form validation and subsequent submit using the Semantic UI and JQuery. In this follow up post, we discuss how we can enhance the validation capabilities further, by having a custom validation that depends on an external API call.

For the sake of example, let’s focus on an mock User Sign Up page, where we would be checking if the username exists prior to form submit.

Let’s write down our basic form first.

<form class="ui form" method='post' id="RegisterUser">
  <h4 class="ui dividing header">User Sign Up</h4>
  <div class="field">
    <div class="two fields">
      <div class="eight wide field">
        <label>UserName</label>
        <input type="text" placeholder="Username" id="username">
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <button class="ui button" tabindex="0">Sign Up</button>
  <div class="ui hidden negative message" id="formresult"></div>
  <div class="ui error message" id="formvalidation"></div>
</form>

Now, let’s create our Validation Script.

var formvalidationrules = {
    on: 'submit',
    fields: {
      username: {
        identifier: 'username',
        rules: [{
          type: 'custom',
          prompt: 'username already exists'
        }]
      },
    },
    onSuccess: function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
    }
  };

  $('#RegisterUser').form(formvalidationrules);

As you can see, the rule type has been specified as ‘custom’. The next obvious task is to write down the method to do the custom validation itself.

$.fn.form.settings.rules.custom = function() {
    var result;
    $.ajax({
      type: 'POST',
      url: '/echo/html/',
      async: false,
      data: {
        'html': $('#username').val()
      },
      success: function(data) {
        result = !(data == 'test');

      },
    });
    return result;

  };

Couple of things to note here.
a) The rule method has been added to form.settings.rules.
b) Now this is very important, your ajax calls needs to be synchronous.

That’s it, you are ready to roll. Check out the script in action in Fiddle Link

Workaround for MySql 5.7 EF DbFirst Issue

Anyone working on .Net application with MySql 5.7 and EF in Db First Approach would have come across what is an officially confirmed bug.  This bug rises when you attempt to generate/update your Entity Model after changes to the Database.

“Unable to generate the model because of the following exception: ‘System.Data.StrongTypingException: The value for column ‘IsPrimaryKey’ in table ‘TableDetails’ is DBNull. —> System.InvalidCastException:”

The workaround you need to do to fix this one

  1. Open your Workbench and execute following commands on your Db.
set global optimizer_switch='derived_merge=off';
set optimizer_switch='derived_merge=off';
  1. Close your workbench ( you might have to restart your visual studio as well ).
  2. Generate/Update your model.
That should work.

Form Validation and Submit using Semantic UI and JQuery

Bootstrap, despite all the effort to make it easily understandable, always relied heavily on its short hand notations for css classes. This seemed okay, until Semantic UI entered the race with its near perfect usage of natural language. The fact that it is well integrated with jQuery makes it a good choice for web developers.

One of the most common tasks in any web development has to do with form. The following code illustrates how to validate the form and submit it using the Semantic UI APIs.

 

                <form class="ui large form" method="POST" role="form" id="ValidateUser">
                    <section class="ui stacked segment">
                        <div class="field">
                            <div class="ui left icon input">
                                <i class="user icon"></i>
                                @Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.UserName, new { placeholder = "UserName",id="username" })
                                @Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.UserName)
                            </div>
                        </div>
                        <div class="field">
                            <div class="ui left icon input">
                                <i class="lock icon"></i>
                                @Html.PasswordFor(a => a.Password, new { placeholder = "Password",id="password" })
                                @Html.ValidationMessageFor(a => a.Password)
                            </div>
                        </div>

                        <input id="submitbutton" class="ui submit fluid large green button" type="submit" value="Login"/> 
                        <!-- <div class="ui blue submit button">Submit</div> -->
                        <div class="ui hidden negative message" id="formresult"></div>
                        <div class="ui error message" id="formvalidation"></div>
                    </section>
                </form>
$(document).ready(function () {

            var urllink = '@Url.Action("Login", "Validation")';


            $('#ValidateUser').form(
                                     {
                                         on: 'blur',
                                         fields: {
                                             username: {
                                                 identifier: 'username',
                                                 rules: [{
                                                     type: 'empty',
                                                     prompt: 'Username cannot be empty'
                                                 }]
                                             },
                                             password: {
                                                 identifier: 'password',
                                                 rules: [{
                                                     type: 'empty',
                                                     prompt: 'Password cannot be emtpy'
                                                 }]
                                             }
                                         },
                                         onSuccess: function (event) {
                                             $('#formresult').hide();
                                             $('#formresult').text('');
                                             event.preventDefault();
                                             return false;
                                         }

                                     }
                                   )
                                 .api({
                                     url: urllink,
                                     method:'POST',
                                     serializeForm: true,
                                     data: new FormData(this),
                                     onSuccess: function (result) {
                                        $('#formresult').show();
                                        if (result.Success) {
                                            window.location = "/Dashboard/Dashboard";
                                        }
                                        else {

                                            $('#formresult').append(result.Msg);
                                        }
                                        return false;
                                    }
                    });


        });

Design Patterns : Adapter Pattern

There is already a large amount of literature on the Internet which discusses Adapter Pattern. However, the purpose of article is to showcase the implementations of the Adapter Pattern, rather than discussing the application of the pattern. In this post, adapter class is implemented using

1. Inheritance
2. Dependency Injection
3. Generics

Consider your old legacy code, which has a single method, GetEmployeeList.

public interface IHRSoftware
    {
        List<string> GetEmployeeNameList();
    }
    public class HRSoftware : IHRSoftware
    {
        public List<string> GetEmployeeNameList()
        {
            return new List<string>() { "Jia", "Anu", "Sreena" };
        }
    }

Client, consumes the class as follows.

            IHRSoftware hrsoft = new HRSoftware();
            foreach (var item in hrsoft.GetEmployeeNameList())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item);
            }

Now, it so happened that the Client has gone through an overhaul and is now looking to use a new contract (interface), namely INewAgeSoftware, which exposes a property EmployeeList, replacing the GetEmployeeNameList Method. The interface declaration is as shown below.

    public interface INewAgeHRSoftware
    {
        List<string> EmployeeList { get;  }
    }

You however, would like to use your old existing code, without actually going ahead and making the changes in your legacy code. This is where adapter pattern come in handy. Following are different implementations of Adapter Class

1. Using Inheritance.

    public class AdapterWithInheritence : HRSoftware, INewAgeHRSoftware
    {

        public List<string> EmployeeList
        {
            get
            {
                return this.GetEmployeeNameList();
            }
        }
    }

2. Using Dependency Injection

    public class AdapterWithDI : INewAgeHRSoftware
    {
        private IHRSoftware _HRInstance;
        public AdapterWithDI(IHRSoftware HRSoftInstance)
        {
            _HRInstance = HRSoftInstance;
        }
        public List<string> EmployeeList
        {
            get
            {
                return _HRInstance.GetEmployeeNameList();
            }
        }
    }

3. And Finally, using Generics

    public class AdapterWithGenerics<T> : INewAgeHRSoftware where T : HRSoftware
    {
        private T _HRInstance;
        public AdapterWithGenerics(T Instance)
        {
            _HRInstance = Instance;
        }

        public List<string> EmployeeList
        {
            get
            {
                return _HRInstance.GetEmployeeNameList();
            }
        }
    }

Your new Client class would now look as follows

 Console.WriteLine("Fetching from NewAgeHRSoftware - Adapter via Inheritence");
            INewAgeHRSoftware newhrsoftInheritence = new AdapterWithInheritence();
            foreach (var item in newhrsoftInheritence.EmployeeList)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Fetching from NewAgeHRSoftware - Adapter via DI");
            INewAgeHRSoftware newhrsoftDI = new AdapterWithDI(new HRSoftware());
            foreach (var item in newhrsoftInheritence.EmployeeList)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Fetching from NewAgeHRSoftware - Adapter via Generics");
            INewAgeHRSoftware newhrsoftGenerics= new AdapterWithGenerics<HRSoftware>(new HRSoftware());
            foreach (var item in newhrsoftGenerics.EmployeeList)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(item);
            }